Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Mark & Danielle Motley

Mark & Danielle Motley

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

624 Coleman Boulevard,
Moultrie Plaza
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

Phone: (843) 216-8800
Fax: (843) 216-8800
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sun: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Comments:
Mark & Danielle are the owners of the Wild Birds Unlimited in Mt. Pleasant. If you need anything please do not hesitate to contact us. We are very passionate about our store and our hobby!

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We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

 

Hummingbirds are Back!

Hummingbirds

Enjoying Your Hummingbirds More

With hummingbird migration in full force, what can you do to further enjoy the most exciting and captivating birds to visit your yard? Improve the view, offer multiple feeders and take a closer look.

Improve the View

• Get a closer view of hummingbirds with our Decorative Window Hummingbird Feeder, or bring your exisitng hummingbird feeders closer to your window with an Advanced Pole System® or hummingbird pole. 
• Get clearer views of ALL the visiting hummingbirds with any WBU Hummingbird Feeder. Our tray-style feeders don’t block the view (gravity-fed bottle feeders block views).
• Our High Perch™ Hummingbird Feeder features a high perch that allows hummingbirds to comfortably rest. Longer perching/sitting times at the feeder provide better, longer views of the birds.

Multiple Feeders: Ban the Bully!

• Hummingbirds, particularly adult males, can be very feisty and aggressive when defending their territories. Multiple feeders, spread throughout your yard, will encourage more hummingbirds to visit and keep bullies at bay.
• The more feeders you offer and the more spread out they are, the more difficult it is for a protective hummingbird to defend all the feeders. Others, like females or even juveniles, will be able to eat more often, perhaps staying longer to feed or rest at feeders.

Take a Closer Look

• Watch hummingbirds' tongues as they move in and out of the mouth (up to 12 times per second) to lap up nectar.
• Catch a glimpse of their tiny feet. Hummingbirds have very small feet that are primarily used for preening and perching.
• Look for yellow pollen, from foraging at flowers, on hummingbirds' foreheads.
• Watch how they fan their tail at one another, dart at one another or even fly in a pendulum-style arch at one another. All are forms of physical communication.

 

 

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